Anne Meyer
March 2nd 2021 15:00

Dr. Anne Meyer

Dr. Anne S. Meyer is an Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester, USA. Dr. Meyer received her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences at Stanford University (USA) in 2005. She was a postdoctoral fellow in the
Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA).

Her research focuses on using quantitative techniques in the fields of biochemistry, microbiology, and biophysics to study structural dynamics, macromolecular interactions, and physiological responses of organisms to environmental stressors. She
also uses tools of synthetic biology to engineer novel functions into
microorganisms, with a particular focus on the production of improved,
tunable biomaterials and the development of new tools for 3D patterning of bacteria.

In this conversation with Dr. Anne Meyer she will focus on the conjunction of clean energy and regenerative materials. Specifically she will map the research of her lab onto the dimensions of harvesting kinetic energy, harvesting sunlight and ideas of energy storage.

These build on her work on 3D printing of bacteria, a cutting-edge technology for producing spatially-patterned biomaterials.

The Meyer lab has been developing inexpensive, DIY 3D bacteria printers for the production of living materials that are biologically and physically robust, that can respond to their environments, and that can produce advanced materials with three-dimensional shapes. These materials will have wide-ranging applications for developing therapeutic treatments, sustainable materials production, and bioremediation of the environment.

Anne Meyer
January 13th 2021 15:00

Dr. Anne Meyer

Dr. Anne S. Meyer is an Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester, USA. Dr. Meyer received her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences at Stanford University (USA) in 2005. She was a postdoctoral fellow in the
Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA).

Her research focuses on using quantitative techniques in the fields of biochemistry, microbiology, and biophysics to study structural dynamics, macromolecular interactions, and physiological responses of organisms to environmental stressors. She
also uses tools of synthetic biology to engineer novel functions into
microorganisms, with a particular focus on the production of improved,
tunable biomaterials and the development of new tools for 3D patterning of bacteria.

Hear from Dr. Anne Meyer about her work on living materials 3D printed into structures that behave like biofilms, for example opening the possibility for using them as a standardized way to test new antibiotic drugs, among many possible applications.

Thank you

We will evaluate your application and get back to you! Please note that we will draw the final participants randomly. In case you cannot attend in person, we can offer to give you access to the recorded conversation.

For centuries the power of science has driven us forward. It has unlocked the secrets of the natural world and driven innovation. Robust scientific research serves as the foundation for progress.

New materials which are in symbiosis with nature, will play an elementary role in the progress towards solving the SDGs. We at nextness believe that advanced materials have the ability to solve the world’s most fundamental challenges.

We call these materials - regenerative materials.

What Do We Do?

nextness exists to bring the people together to develop and scale regenerative materials to solve the world's biggest challenges.

Scientists, providing the deep knowledge required. Entrepreneurs, building solutions based on science. Investors, providing the capital required to scale.

In a series of exclusive events featuring the leading scientists in the field from around the globe, you have the opportunity for building intellectual capital and social capital towards a world of regenerative materials.

The Program

Once a month we assemble a small group of leaders from venture capital, science and entrepreneurship to learn, discuss and connect. Together we will learn about developments in TRL3-5 which have the potential to change markets and industries and discuss practical applications.

We offer several modes for participation. Reach out to us to learn more.

The Focus

This article lays out the metaphysical foundations of NextNess for those who would like to dig deep into the WHY of what we do here.

TL;DR - For humanity to survive and thrive we need to be deliberate and conscious about the questions we ask to (and as) our scientific community. With NextNess we ask questions that have the potential to have a direct positive impact towards planetary conditions in which each human can live a fulfilled life with a primary focus on energy (creation and storage).

Nick Bostrom opens a conversation about the responsibility of science in managing its risks in the article "The Vulnerable World Hypothesis".

He builds his argument on the metaphor that new scientific findings are like balls picked from a container. Depending on their color - white, grey or black - they have a positive, potentially catastrophic or fatal effect on humanity. In his image the container has a finite width because some new findings depend on other findings made first.

With NextNess we would like to add another dimension to the metaphor: directionality.

We can follow the natural growth of the building of scientific knowledge, led by curiosity and naturally emerging next questions. A part of the scientific community works this way. The majority of the scientific community however, engages in answering questions asked by corporations or a government. Both largely rely on market mechanisms to surface questions considered worth being answered by science.

This is understandable since the core fabric of our western civilization is weaved by the flow of financial capital. Unfortunately they don't have mechanisms to account for skewed signalling occurring through inequalities in wealth distribution.

If we broaden our perspective of wealth by applying the ideas of Ethan Soloviev's Eight Forms Of Capital and start looking at flows of inputs through this lens, the inequalities become less pronounced or even disappear.

If we base our vision on what a fulfilled life looks like on the maximization of all five dimension of Maslow's description of human needs and then map the forms of capital required for each dimension in layers of abstraction (abstraction in this context refers to how immediate the conversion of a form of capital as an input functions towards the fulfillment of the dimension), we arrive at a very interesting valuation of the various forms of capital.

capital valuation

The most relevant forms of capital are the ephemeral ones, followed by living and material. Financial capital plays almost no role:

capital valuation

From the natural sciences perspective of NextNess this results in a directionality of how to create the material inputs into the five dimensions along the fields of food, shelter, garments and energy. In the light of the enormous progress, research and economic activity in the fields of food, shelter and garments, NextNess aims to focus on questions around energy:

How can we use new materials to harvest renewable energy sources? How can we store the energy in new and sustainable forms? How can we ensure even distribution of access to these forms of energy creation and storage?

welcome

We will keep you in the loop on what is going on inside of NextNess and how to be an active part! We look forward to meeting you!

Steph, Malte and T